When you’re abroad it ain’t always sunny days and happy moments, sometimes you might find yourself in an unfortunate situation. Nothing could be worst than being in need of help, and not being able to communicate with anyone around you, so I was thinking “it’s a pretty downer topic, but someones gonna need it sooner or later” That’s why today I’m gonna go down the dictionary road with some emergency phrases you can use in Italian.

Hopefully, you won’t have any medical emergency Italy, but one never knows what may happen. For starters, if you’re wondering what is the emergency number in Italy worry not, it’s 113. There is also a specific number for each department.

112 – Carabinieri 

115 – Fire Department

118 – Ambulance

Now you know the emergency number Italy has, so use it wisely cause if it’s not emergency worthy you’ll concur in a pretty hefty fine, that you don’t want on your hands while you’re on your term abroad.

Let’s start our emergency services Italy list that’ll help you communicate with the people around you, and make your shitty moments be a bit less confusing, also if you think there should be more phrases you’d like to know in Italian, let us know.

Help! – Aiuto!

The first thing you might want to shout whatever the situation is is “Aiuto!” It’s the original SOS. The Italian way of asking for help, I mean you can use Aiuto in less complicated situations as well, just don’t shout it and you’ll get the message across.

The buildings on fire! – L’edificio è in fiamme!

This one is a really bad situation to find yourself in, but around last year when we started working on StudentsVille, some students in Florence almost burned down their apartment while cooking some pasta. Please don’t burn down the house while cooking pasta, if it has to happen let it be for some electrical thing, or even better just don’t burn down the town at all.

Call an ambulance! – Chiamate un ambulanza!

I personally hope that you have to use this for someone that’s in need in help and not for yourself, cause that’s a bad transfer if I ever heard of one before. Keep in mind that the emergency number Italy is 118, let me say that again the 911 emergency number in Italy is 118. (that felt like some telemarketer shit right there)

Stop, thief! – Al Ladro!

Unfortunately, tourists are petty thief’s favorite type of victim, that’s because they leave town. The first recommendation is keep everything close to you and make sure that you’re not giving off a cash money vibe, cause even though theft is a frustrating and f’d up crime, it’s still around. So be careful. Extra tip, if you know who did it start chasing after them and shout that “Al Ladro” while pointing at the perpetrator, Italian’s love a good chase the thief during a boring afternoon, and even if the criminal gets away you’ll never forget the day 10 random Italians ran after a thief with you.

I’d like to report a theft – Vorrei denunciare un furto

After your mad run, you didn’t catch the thief, but after you freak remember that you can, and always have to go report the crime to the cops. Once you find you’re local police station tell the officers “Vorrei denunciare un furto” and they’ll start writing down the report.

My phone’s been stolen – Mi hanno rubato il telefono

Once you’re giving the details to the cops, you have to tell them what’s been stolen from you, and in this example, we’re taking a phone theft. If they stole something else like your wallet that is “portafoglio”, your laptop “portatile”, your handbag “la borsa”.e

I’ve locked myself out of my room – Mi sono chiuso fuori dalla mia camera

Enough downer situations, let’s close it with an annoying one that doesn’t imply any theft or any harm. Something that you won’t need an Italy emergency number, something you’ll probably solve with your landlord or RA (even though your RA probably speaks English, but hey you never know). But really, don’t use the emergency telephone numbers in Italy for this situation, unless your landlord tells you to call the fire department.